Looking under the hood – The IRB formula

This post is irredeemably technical so stop here if that is not your interest. If you need to understand some of the mechanics of the formula used to calculate credit risk weighted assets under the advanced Internal Ratings Based (IRB) approach then the BCBS published a paper in 2005 which offers an explanation:

  • describing the economic foundations
  • as well as the underlying mathematical model and its input parameters.

While a lot has changed as a result of Basel III, the models underlying the calculation of Internal Rating Based Capital (IRB) requirements are still based on the core principles agreed under Basel II that are explained in this BCBS paper.

The notes in the linked page below mostly summarise the July 2005 paper with some emphasis (bolded text) and comments (in italics) that I have added. The paper is a bit technical but worth reading if you want to understand the original thinking behind the Basel II risk weights for credit risk.

I initially found the paper useful for revisiting the foundation assumptions of the IRB framework as background to considering the regulatory treatment of Expected Loss as banks transition to IFRS9. The background on how the RW was initially intended to cover both Expected and Unexpected Loss, but was revised such that capital was only required to cover Unexpected Loss, is especially useful when considering the interaction of loan loss provisioning with capital requirements.

Reading the BCBS paper has also been useful for thinking through a range of related issues including:

  • The rationale for, and impact of, prudential conservatism in setting the risk parameters used in the IRB formula
  • The cyclicality of a risk sensitive capital requirement (and potential for pro cyclicality) and what might be done to mitigate the risk of pro-cyclical impacts on the economy

If you have read this far then my summary of the BCBS paper and my comments /observations can be found here (and thank you).

I am not a credit risk model expert, so the summary of the paper and my comments must be read with that in mind. I did this to help me think through some of the issues with bank capital adequacy. Hopefully others will find the notes useful. If you see something wrong or something you disagree with then let me know.

Author: From the Outside

After working in the Australian banking system for close to four decades, I am taking some time out to write and reflect on what I have learned. My primary area of expertise is bank capital management but this blog aims to offer a bank insider's outside perspective on banking, capital, economics, finance and risk.

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